Disney’s A Christmas Carol Movie Review


By Matthew Le Blanc

Christmas is right around the corner and award winning film director, producer and screenwriter, Robert Zemeckis brings us a new animated film to herald in the season. Disney’s A Christmas Carol is the retelling of a Charles Dickens classic, but for a family movie, it is marred with scenes of awkwardness, hard-to-follow dialogue and mature content.

The movie follows the current trend of making what should be a child friendly film into something adult oriented. The signs are obvious early on as Scrooge, played by Jim Carrey, is shown mourning over the lifeless body of his long time business partner, Jacob Marley, and later during Marley’s ghostly visit. Even though some of the scenes are humorous, the children present in the theatre were audibly shaken by the ghost’s appearance and antics.

Even more unsettling was the Ghost of Christmas Past, which is also voiced by Jim Carrey. The infamous 1971 Willy Wonka boat ride is the only comparison I can muster for this character. The ghost’s mannerisms and speech were so creepy that I sat there in disbelief until the Burger King, moonlighting for the Ghost of Christmas Present, swept Scrooge away on another adventure.

Tim Burton could have easily produced the last bits of the film as the Ghost of Christmas Yet To Come chases Scrooge around a dark and foreboding London. If the kids weren’t already upset, I’m sure this did the trick. There’s something about being hunted by a Grim Reaper driven carriage and falling into your own grave that would truly scare the Dickens out of anybody.

Visually the film is spectacular and there is lots of fun to be had. Every corner of the screen is brimming with detail and the cinematography and musical score are top-notch. However, parents should take caution when bringing their young ones to the show due to its visually graphic content.

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